May Adam is likely the oldest South Dakota law firm. It was first established in Pierre in 1881 as Wakefield & Horner. Since that time, it has been known successively as: Horner & Stewart; Horner, Martens & Goldsmith; Martens & Goldsmith; Martens, Goldsmith & May; Martens, Goldsmith, May & Porter; Martens, Goldsmith, May, Porter & Adam; May, Porter, Adam, Gerdes & Thompson; May, Adam, Gerdes & Thompson LLP.

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Glenn Martens (1881-1963) and Karl Goldsmith (1885-1966) were practicing lawyers in Pierre, SD from just after the turn of the century to the middle 1960’s. Martens was a professional boxer, and apprenticed and read the law to become a lawyer, while Goldsmith was a graduate of Yale University.

Martens made a practice and was known as a litigator. He served in the State Senate from 1923-24 and as Chairman of the South Dakota Republican Party from 1938 to 1944. Goldsmith had a substantial office practice. He served without compensation for many years as Executive Secretary of the State Bar of South Dakota. Martens and Goldsmith were fast friends and highly regarded practitioners whose individual professional skills complemented one another.

In 1950, Martens and Goldsmith took a local boy into the practice. Warren W. May was born in Philip, grew up in Pierre, and had gone off to New Guinea and Australia serving in World War II. When he mustered out, he went to law school at the University of Minnesota and then returned home serving a term as state’s attorney before joining the South Dakota law firm. Warren developed and built the practice as he built a statewide reputation as a brilliant South Dakota lawyer and lobbyist. Stories about Warren’s courtroom and statehouse appearances are legendary and we often revel in telling what we have heard and listening to what we haven’t about his practice. He’s now in his 90’s, spry and mischievous as ever. We still look to him as a mentor.

Don Porter was born in Madison, SD. He was practicing in Chamberlain when Warren May needed a partner, and so Don and his family moved to Pierre. Don had a sly grin and a way about him which endeared him to those he met. On January 1, 1977, Don was appointed to the South Dakota Supreme Court and on March 15, 1979, President Carter nominated him to U.S. District Court. He served on the federal bench here in Pierre until his death, serving as chief judge from 1985 to 1991.

Tom Adam came to Pierre from the USD law school in the early 60’s. Tom was very politically attuned. He was very proud to represent the South Dakota Bankers Association for almost 40 years. As one of our great lawyers in Pierre, SD, he developed an office practice which cast far and wide, helping farmers and ranchers meet their needs. Tom now lives in Sioux Falls and we miss his daily visits to the office.

Dave Gerdes grew up in Lemmon, SD and in 1968, after law school at USD chose May, Porter and Adam over the Burroughs Typewriter Company. Dave was a skilled litigator with over 70 jury trials to his credit. Dave also represented our state’s utility companies before the legislature and the Public Utilities Commission. He was President of the State Bar and served in the Jackrabbit Bar Association and in the Lawyer Pilot Association. Dave and his wife Karen split time between their homes in Fort Pierre and Sarasota, Florida, and we fully enjoy his company from time to time when they’re in the area.

Charlie Thompson grew up on a ranch northwest of Fort Pierre, on Mission Ridge. In 1968, after stints at Colorado State and USD law school, he started practicing with us. As a South Dakota lawyer, he was a tenacious litigator and practiced throughout the state. His friendly jovial persona lent itself well to the rural facets of practice. He performed well in the cities also, and his deep involvement with the leadership of the American Bar Association is a source of pride for him. Charlie lives in Pierre, still actively maintains the family ranch and keeps up with his kids and grandkids. We get to hear his booming laughter in the office a couple of times a week.